Religious Studies 475: Sports and Spirituality

Students in this semester-long course explore spirituality through the analogy of sports.  Students will determine how human beings encounter the Holy in the midst of everyday life with emphasis on athletic experiences as an athlete and/or as a fan (of specific athletes, teams, and/or sporting events).  Students will also examine the relationship between competitive, organized athletics and elements of communal religious practice and purpose.  Included is a study of embedded meaning associated with the movement of the human body, an analysis of ritual practice, a survey of major events where sports and religious practice intersect, and a differentiation between religious practice and personal spirituality.  Ultimately, students will come to know more deeply the ways in which one relates to the Holy or the Transcendent in the course of their own faith journey, and how personal faith contributes to communal practice and celebration of what is Holy and Transcendent.

Religious Studies 201: Christology

At a pivotal moment in the Gospel of Matthew, Jesus asks his disciples “Who do you say that I am?”  The confusion that ensues among his followers is emblematic of the struggle that Christians and non-Christians alike have had throughout history to answer that very question.  In this course, students will be challenged to offer their own unique contributions to the discourse on the identity of Jesus.  They will grapple directly with the question Jesus posed to his disciples by developing responses based on multiple and intersecting paradigms: the personal, the historical, the theological, and the anthropological to name just a few.  Effectively engaging with the course will lead to greater skills in the areas of critical thinking, cultural competency, and religious imagination, among others.

Physical Education 316: Foundations in Kinesiology 2

Foundations of Kinesiology is a course that introduces students to the field of Kinesiology and its overall relationship with exercise science, sports performance, and sports psychology.  This UC/CSU approved College Prep Elective (“G”) course will be taught in two one-semester courses allowing maximum flexibility in scheduling.  Students do not have to take Foundations of Kinesiology 1 to take Foundations of Kinesiology 2.

While each course will share common threads in training, nutrition, sports, psychology, and basic human anatomy, each course offers a slightly different approach to discovering the keys that improve performance.  Both courses will involve some physical activity.

Foundations of Kinesiology 2 will concentrate on “why” the body moves by understanding the relationship between fitness principles of exercise and how to improve sports performance.  Foundations 2 will also introduce to students the vocations/careers associated with the field of Kinesiology.

*This class will be offered pending staffing availability and adequate enrollment.

Physical Education 315: Foundation in Kinesiology 1

Foundations of Kinesiology is a course that introduces students to the field of Kinesiology and its overall relationship with exercise science, sports performance, and sports psychology.  This UC/CSU approved College Prep Elective (“G”) course will be taught in two one-semester courses allowing maximum flexibility in scheduling.  Students do not have to take Foundations of Kinesiology 1 to take Foundations of Kinesiology 2.

While each course will share common threads in training, nutrition, sports, psychology, and basic human anatomy, each course offers a slightly different approach to discovering the keys that improve performance.  Both courses will involve some physical activity.

Foundations of Kinesiology 1 will concentrate on “how” the body moves by investigating human movement and understanding the benefits of kinesiology.  Foundations 1 will explore the purpose of exercise and sports nutrition.

*This class will be offered pending staffing availability and adequate enrollment.

Multimedia Design 1B

This class further develops skills learned in Multimedia Design 1A with a focus on utilizing 2D and 3D graphics, sound and video-editing software such as Photoshop, Illustrator, Procreate, Logic, FL Studio, Soundtrap, Final Cut Pro, Premiere, OnShape, Blender, and game design in Roblox and Unity.  The development of effective narrative structures will be emphasized so that students learn to use the various media to create intentional works with meaning.  Particular attention will be paid to the design process and students’ conscious development of their own creative process.  Sample projects include stop motions, animations, music videos, special effects,  student documentary films, and the creation of video games.  Student work will culminate with a digital portfolio.

Multimedia Design 1A

This is an introductory computer art and design course with a focus on 2D and 3D graphics, sound and video-editing software. Coursework includes a variety of design projects created with software programs such as Photoshop, Illustrator, Procreate, Logic, FL Studio, Soundtrap, Final Cut Pro, Premiere, TinkerCAD, and game design in Roblox. The learning of traditional art and design principles will be integrated into students’ creative work and the course will culminate with a digital portfolio.

English 430: Modern American Authors

NOTE:  This course will not be offered for the 2024-2025 school year. It may be available the following year.

In this course we will do an in-depth study of modern authors, contextualizing these voices as they fit into our cultural identity.  In this one semester course, we will read short stories, creative nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and song lyrics.  We will examine the narrator and the self, analyzing the way American individuality has shifted American literature.  We will identify and analyze literary devices and structures in popular texts, and use these as models for our own creative writing.  Formal grammar and vocabulary lessons will focus on clarification of voice.  In addition to standard 5 paragraph analytical essays, we will write creative nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and a multi-genre research paper.

English 420: Satire in Literature and Popular Culture

This is a course designed to analyze how art uses satire to question the major social and political challenges of our times. Effective satire often tries to institute a change in thought or behavior either on the part of the subject of the satire, the audience, or the reader.  Using a variety of critical lenses, students will explore satire in the essay, short story, novel, film, and in popular representation in the media. Students will be able to differentiate between farce, spoof, parody, irony, and satire, and use those skills in creative projects of their own. Students will also write an analytical research paper to explore the ways that satire can be used to change hearts and minds.  Some sample texts include: A Modest Proposal, Jonathan Swift; Candide, Voltaire; Mister Monkey, Francine Prose; selected articles by Christopher Hitchens, Alessandra Stanley, Nora Ephron; Text from Adbusters, The Onion, & topical, popular memes; and films such as Mean Girls, Shrek, Brazil.

English 435: Women in Literature

This course is designed to investigate various portrayals of women in literature, film, and other media in order to learn how gender roles develop and change in different historical, political, and cultural contexts.    Through a study of diverse literary greats – Virginia Woolf, Zora Neale Hurston, Kate Chopin, Rita Dove, William Shakespeare, Barbara Kingsolver, and others — we will examine the myriad images of women in literature.  We will explore how women have accepted, struggled against, and transformed traditional roles of daughter, sister, friend, wife, and mother.  This course involves critical thinking about contemporary issues and will prepare the student for a college introductory composition class.  The writing in the course will be both expository and creative; we will react critically to the works we read, and we will continue to develop our personal literary “voices.”  The goal of the course is to broaden our understanding– historically, socially, economically, spiritually — of women, of men and women in relationships, of the cultural forces that make “gender” such a compelling, interesting topic.  This course promises to be exciting and valuable to women and men; all are encouraged to join in the adventure of “Women in Literature.”

English 450: Mythology

In this single semester course, students will investigate the patterns and archetypes of world mythology by reading a variety of ancient myths, in addition to plays, short stories, poems, and novels that utilize the themes and characters inspired by myth.  Students will consider different theories concerning the origin of myths and the function that this genre serves in the development of the individual and society. Units of study will include creation myths from around the world, Mesopotamian myths, classical myths, the Hero’s Journey pattern, Norse mythology and modern works inspired by mythology.  In addition to enjoying the irresistible charm of fantasy, students will also analyze the “truths” or the myths by discussing the relevance of mythological themes in the modern world.  Students will purchase core texts; however, we will study numerous excerpts from on-line sources, particularly the Perseus Project.  Another component of this class will be working on writing skills, including the expository essay and creative writing.